build along

How to make a plains indian style quiver

Plains indian quiverOne of the most comfortable quivers to carry in the field or woods is a plains indian style quiver. This one was made long enough to cover the fletchings of a standard 28″ arrow with field points or broadheads with just the nocks sticking out of the top. With the nocks showing, they are easy to get a hold of with your fingers, but with the fletchings covered up, they don’t make loud scratching or scraping noises against stuff like tree branches or even the ground if you are crawling around. I just find this quiver style to be a really comfortable and quiet set up for hunting.

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How to make a simple thickness sander for bow laminations

a simple lamination grinder

When I started making bows, I had to order finished bow laminations and overlays from a bow making supplier because I didn’t have a thickness sander. Even though buying prepared laminations was faster and easier, the problem was that I had to order everything I needed one or two weeks before starting the bow. Also, if I didn’t order enough lams or the right ones, or…smack me with an arrow shaft…I broke a lamination, then I wouldn’t have enough lams or overlays to complete the bow and production would come to a screeching stop. Continue reading

How to make and read a force/draw curve (part 3)

Brent's bow force/draw curveHow to READ a force/draw curve

Welcome to part three of the series! In part one, we learned how to build a bow weighing rack and measure the draw weights of our bow at each one inch increment of the draw. We recorded the data on a note pad and saved it for part two. Then, in part two, we entered the data into a table in the spreadsheet template that I created for Microsoft Excel, and watched Excel automatically create a line graph showing the force/draw curve and calculate some values about stored energy and efficiency. Now, in part three, we will read the force draw curve, the values created in the table, and interpret what they tell us about the bow. This is the best part of the series! Continue reading

How to make and read a force/draw curve (part 2)

force draw curve photoHow to MAKE a force/draw curve

Welcome to part two of the series! In part one, we learned how to build a bow weighing rack and measure the draw weights of our bow at each one inch increment of the draw. We recorded the data on a note pad and saved it for part two. Now, in part two, we will enter that data into a table and create a line graph showing the force/draw curve. Continue reading

How to make and read a force/draw curve (part 1)

The bow at full drawBuilding and setting up the bow weighing rack

Hey!…I’m so glad that you are here and interested in learning how to weigh your bow and make a force/draw curve! There is so much you can learn about your bow from the force/draw curve. Are you sometimes dazed and confused by scientific-type folks who use intimidating words like “stored energy,” “peak draw force,” and so on? If so, you’re not alone. This force/draw stuff can be very confusing. Let me encourage you to stay with me on this series…once you read through these posts and try it out on your own bow, you won’t be intimidated any more. Continue reading

How to install buffalo horn overlays on limb tips

horn tip close upHere’s a build along for adding those sexy buffalo horn overlays to your limb tips. I think they look great and make a good bow look even better. There’s just something about polished horn on a trad bow that makes it look really professional. Adding layers of horn, antler, or linen phenolic to your limb tips will make your bow limb tips more durable for use with high performance strings, stronger to avoid scratches and denting by rough use while hunting, plus…they just look fantastic. Horn tips are good for both an old bow needing tip repairs or for that new bow you are making. They look good and work great on all types of bows: self bows, wood laminate bows, and fiberglass bows. They are simple to install yourself and this build along will show you how. Click “Buffalo horn limb tip build along” to see the rest of the build along.

Some folks think I’m crazy for computer modeling bows

grid for SuperTillerDo you think I’m crazy for trying to do computer modeling of bows? Some of my chat room friends sure think so. Check out these quotes…

I don’t graph storage per inch…remember, I don’t fart around with SuperTiller…
…just razz’n ya buddy.”

Jimbo, you do realize that we will tease you mercilessly about SuperTiller…
…that is until we learn how to use it.”

I’ve often been accused of being more of a bow designer than a bow maker. I guess that might be true to a certain extent. I have a 45 minute one-way commute to the office and spend much of this time “designing” bows in my mind. I find it amazing how a stick bow is so simple, but the physics of it are so complex. Continue reading

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