String nock files for making bows

nock files 680x380 150x150 String nock files for making bowsWhen I first started making bows, the best instructions that I could find said to use a “6” rat tail file” for cutting in the string nocks at the limb tips. The 6″ file made a pretty wide string groove that had to also be pretty deep in order to keep the string from slipping out. I remember one time taking a new osage self bow I had just made to my family’s Thanksgiving dinner. My tall, younger brother pulled the bow back pretty far and the top string loop came right off of the bow, sending the bow flying across the room full of people, hitting a bookshelf with awesome force, and making a huge clattering noise. The limb tip of that bow obviously bent far enough for the string loop to slip out of the string groove. After that experience, Continue reading

Low, medium, and high wrist grips for a recurve

low med high wrist 600 150x150 Low, medium, and high wrist grips for a recurveIn the previous post Grip Size of a Recurve I was asked what are good angles for low, medium, and high wrist grips. Well, I’m sure that this is subjective and arbitrary at best, so I made a simple illustration that might be helpful. You can probably print this out and adapt it for use on your own riser design, whether it is a recurve or longbow. Just orient the drawing on your blueprint to make a template, or transfer the outline to the riser block before you cut it out. There isn’t really much difference in the grip portion of either bow style if it is a sculpted grip, the rest of the riser is a bit different, but the grip portion is about the same. The shape of a sculpted grip is pretty much biomorphic (is this a word?) and three dimensional, so the angle of the grip is kind of a rough guess. Anyway, here’s the illustration…

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Grip size of a recurve

dsc 0385 150x150 Grip size of a recurveIn the previous post, Grip size of a longbow, I listed some basic sizes for locator style longbow grips. In this post, I’ll provide the same information for recurves—the best ways to measure a grip and suggested measurements for small, medium, and large recurve grips.

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Grip size of a longbow

DSC 0256 150x150 Grip size of a longbowThe grip on a longbow is usually smaller and more refined than the grip on a hunting recurve, a target recurve, or even a compound bow. Obviously, the most comfortable grip size is determined by the size of your bow hand and your personal preference for the way the grip feels. Plus, we all know that men, women, and children have different hand sizes. In this post I will describe the best ways to measure a grip and suggest some measurements for small, medium, and large grip sizes. Continue reading

Interview with Ken Rohloff of WhippenStick Custom Bows

DSC 0143 3 150x150 Interview with Ken Rohloff of WhippenStick Custom BowsKen Rohloff is the founder of WhippenStick Custom Bows. Ken is a custom bowyer and creator of the bow he calls the “Whippen Stick” custom bow. I first met Ken at the Leatherwall traditional archery forum probably in the early 2000s when he posted a few longbow pics. Immediately, I noticed how his bows stood out from the rest, not just because of the beautiful wood choices, but because of their refined, balanced design features, and obvious superior craftsmanship he had used in their construction. I later got to know Ken better at the Pirates of Archery traditional archery forum where we both posted a lot and had a lot of interesting discussions about making bows. Continue reading

Five common styles of longbow grips

P1010014 150x150 Five common styles of longbow gripsIt might seem like there are a million different types of longbow grips/handles, but I think they can easily be classified in five categories of common styles: 1) straight or “Hill”-style, 2) dished, 3) humped, 4) locator, and 5) sculpted/recurve style. Although each has its own definitive shape, you can probably make about any longbow design with any of these grip styles depending on your preference. In this blog post, let’s look more closely at each of these styles.

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Interview with Bill Howland of Brackenbury Custom Bows

Bill Howland 150x150 Interview with Bill Howland of Brackenbury Custom BowsThis is the first of what I hope will be a series of interviews with custom bowyers. There is so much to learn from these bowyers who work full time doing the craft. I hope you find this information useful in your bow making!

Bill Howland is the owner and bowyer of Brackenbury Custom Bows, Nine Mile Falls, Washington. He has owned and operated the company since August, 2001. The company was started by the late Jim Brackenbury who died in 1991. Bill continues the production of several of Jim Brackenbury’s bow designs. I met Bill at the Pirates of Archery internet forum where we have often shared discussions about making bows. He always has about the best advice that comes from his extensive experience in making custom take-down recurves and longbows. Continue reading

Brent scores big with his Classic Take-down Recurve

Brents buck 150x150 Brent scores big with his Classic Take down RecurveMy friend Brent scored big on this nice 10 point buck this weekend (November 3) with a bow that I made for him. One of his Facebook friends said that “Brent scored on a nice buck with is “old school bow”…lol. As you and I both know, there is nothing old school about a fiberglass recurve, but in this age of high-tech metal compounds I guess that a traditional bow seems like something from the past. There is something really cool about “building your own bow” and killing a deer with it. It is even cooler when it is someone else kills a deer with a bow that you made. Continue reading

Is this the best rasp for making a longbow or a recurve bow?

P1010007 150x150 Is this the best rasp for making a longbow or a recurve bow?Probably the best rasp in my tool box for making bows is the “Universal Bowyer’s Rasp,” also called the “UBR10,” designed and sold by Dean Torges. It is really useful for making all types of bows: recurves, longbows, and self bows, but it is especially good for self bows and wood-backed bows where you tiller the bow by rasping and shaving the belly.

I just want to say right away that I am not trying to be a salesman for this rasp. I don’t sell it on this site, nor do I get a commission for selling it, or referring people to buy it. I just like it…a lot…and that’s good enough for me. Continue reading

Cool link in the build your own bow site stats

world wide link pic 150x150 Cool link in the build your own bow site statsI just had to share this photo of a cool link I saw in the site stats for buildyourownbow.com. Only in the internet era is it possible to share around the world like this with like-minded people of different cultures and different languages. One thing for sure is that we all love archery. Please feel free to make a comment below if you agree. Thanks to the folks at www.mitbbs.com for visiting www.buildyourownbow.com and sharing with your friends.–Jim

 Click the thumbnail to see a larger photo with the buildyourownbow.com link!

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